Our Houses with Multiple Occupants (HMO) Licence plans are Local Authority Compliant and are produced through our own professional measured survey or accurate drawings supplied from you.

They display an accurate and detailed representation of the property including measurements, property amenities and fire safety equipment.

A HMO Floor Plan is an integral part of the Licencing of HMO’s. It must give a general indication of the property layout and should detail room dimensions. The floor plans will also need to indentify the location of any smoke and heat detectors as well all doors, fire doors, windows and escape windows.

Licensing of houses in multiple occupation.

Which HMOs must be licensed?

You must have a licence if you’re renting out a large HMO in England or Wales. Your property is defined as a large HMO if all of the following apply:

  • it is rented to 5 or more people who form more than 1 household
  • some or all tenants share toilet, bathroom or kitchen facilities
  • at least 1 tenant pays rent (or their employer pays it for them)

Even if your property is smaller and rented to fewer people, you may still need a licence depending on the area. Check with your council.

What about HMOs which do not meet the criteria for mandatory licensing?

Councils have discretionary powers to extend licensing to other categories of HMO which are not subject to mandatory licensing. This is known as additional HMO licensing. Before designating an area to be subject to additional licensing, a local council must consider that a significant proportion of HMOs in that area are causing problems for tenants or the neighbourhood due to poor management. The use of this power will also be subject to consultation with those who would be affected by the designation, and approval from Government.

Once an additional licensing designation has come into force it is a requirement that HMOs that are subject to it are licensed. If you are unsure whether a HMO is subject to licensing you should contact the local council for advice. The scheme for designation, that can be inspected at the council’s main office, sets out the geographical area and the types of HMOs to which it applies.

Restrictions

A licence is valid for a maximum of 5 years.

You need a separate licence for each HMO you run.

Conditions

You must make sure:

  • the house is suitable for the number of occupants (this depends on its size and facilities)
  • the manager of the house – you or an agent – is considered to be ‘fit and proper’, for example they have no criminal record or breach of landlord laws or code of practice

You must also:

  • send the council an updated gas safety certificate every year
  • install and maintain smoke alarms
  • provide safety certificates for all electrical appliances when requested

The council may add other conditions to your licence, for example improving the standard of your facilities. They will let you know when you apply.

If you disagree with any conditions the council sets, you can appeal to the First-Tier Tribunal.

You should apply for the licence yourself, but if you use a managing agent they can apply for you.

You’ll be charged a fee which is set by the council.

Fines and penalties

You could get an unlimited fine for renting out an unlicensed HMO.